Deer Mice(Peromyscus)
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Rats may have the long ugly tails and large bodies, but mice are the rodents that you often need to watch out for most. Invading in packs, filled with disease, and the ability to reproduce quickly, deer mice have long been one of the main sources of sanitary issues in North Carolina.

SCIENCE INFORMATION

  • Official Name: Peromyscus
  • Length: 7cm to 10cm
  • Color: Brown on the top, white on the bottom
  • Poisonous: No
  • Cause of Distress: Property Damage, Disease, Noise

LIFE CYCLE OF DEER MICE

Dear mice are prolific breeders, with an average of about 5 babies, 11 times per year. Deer mice babies stay in a central location until they are 6 weeks old, after which they are also already ready to breed. This is one of the reasons that deer mice invasions are problematic – they breed very quickly, and the babies breed with each other forming extensive habitats in your walls, attics, and more.

DEER MICE AS PESTS

Like all rodents, deer mice have a tendency to chew up property, invade food, and leave droppings around the home. They are also the carriers of viruses, more recently a problematic disease known as Hantavirus, which causes a severe flu to those that come into contact with any fluids left behind from the deer mouse. Mouse saliva, urine, and more can all carry Hantavirus, even if the fluid was not left recently.

HOW TO PREVENT DEER MOUSE INVASIONS

Deer mice prevention is crucial both before and after any extermination. Deer mice are not prevented through traps, but through the blocking of any entrances and holes in and around the property. Most mice find entrance points and taken advantage of those points often, coming in and out as they please. If those points are sealed, any mice that live outdoors will not have any way to enter the home. Rat poisons in common mouse areas can also be useful, but it’s better to avoid these toxins unless you already believe you have a problem.